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Australia

Northern Territory

Criminal Code of the Northern Territory of Australia- Sect. 174 

174. Medical termination of pregnancy

(1) It is lawful -

(a) for a medical practitioner who is a gynaecologist or obstetrician to give medical treatment with the intention of procuring the miscarriage of a woman or girl who, he has reasonable cause to believe after medically examining her, has been pregnant for not more than 14 weeks if the medical treatment is given in hospital and the medical practitioner and another medical practitioner are of the opinion, formed in good faith after medical examination of the woman or girl by them, that -

(i) the continuance of the pregnancy would involve greater risk to her life or greater risk of injury to her physical or mental health than if the pregnancy were terminated; or

(ii) there is a substantial risk that, if the pregnancy were not terminated and the child were to be born, the child would have or suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped;

(b) for a medical practitioner to give medical treatment with the intention of procuring the miscarriage of a woman or girl who, he has reasonable cause to believe after medically examining her, has been pregnant for not more than 23 weeks if the medical practitioner is of the opinion, formed in good faith after his medical examination of her, that termination of the pregnancy is immediately necessary to prevent grave injury to her physical or mental health; or

(c) for a medical practitioner to give medical treatment with the intention of procuring the miscarriage of a woman or girl if the treatment is given in good faith for the purpose only of preserving her life.

(2) No person is under a duty, whether by contract or otherwise, to procure or to assist in procuring the miscarriage of a woman or girl or to dispose of or to assist in disposing of an aborted foetus if he has a conscientious objection thereto, but, in any legal proceedings, the burden of proving such a conscientious objection shall rest upon the person claiming to have it  . . .